UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS LOWEL

DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

94.562 DIGITAL FORENSICS

Spring 2017

Instructor:

Dr. Xinwen Fu

Office:

203 Olson Hall

Phone:

(978) 934-3623

E-Mail:

xinwenfu@cs.uml.edu

Homepage:

http://www.cs.uml.edu/~xinwenfu

 

Course Name:

MSIT 5620 Digital Forensics

Credits:

3.00

Duration:

Jan 17, 2017- Apr 29, 2017

Time:

Course Status: Fully Online; Chat Time - 9:00PM each Thursday

Location

Blackboard

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Identifying, preserving and extracting electronic evidence. Students learn how to examine and recover data from operating systems, core forensic procedures for any operating or file system, understanding technical issues in acquiring computer evidence and how to conduct forensically sound examinations to preserve evidence for admission and use in legal proceedings.

TEXTBOOK:

NOTE:

1. Do NOT buy any e-version since it does not have the CD required for this class.
2. Make sure the purchased book has the required CD.

Bill Nelson, Amelia Phillips, and Christopher Steuart, Guide to Computer Forensics and Investigations (with DVD) 5th Edition, Course Technology; 5 edition (January 15, 2015), ISBN-10: 1285060032.

COURSE GOALS

We will learn about the emerging field of Computer Forensics - the science of obtaining and analyzing evidence from computers. This evidence may be found on storage devices, such as hard drives, which are confiscated under warrant from personal or professional computers; or it may be found by traces of activity on computer networks. We will learn the tools and process of Computer Forensics.

We will learn how computers and the Internet work so that they change rapidly, you can understand the changes. Specific topics include how computer hardware and software work, what data formats are, how network hardware works and how the Internet works.

We will explore what kind of crimes computer forensics specialist investigate, and learn about what information gathering is legal/illegal and ethical/unethical. As technology emerges and changes so quickly, many of the aspects of these laws and guidelines are still being developed, which will make for an interesting academic exploration of the issues.

COURSE PREREQUISITES:

The class is open to students with minimal computer science knowledge. The following knowledge will help your study.

ONLINE INTERACTION GUIDELINE

This is a fully online course. We require active participation by students to achieve the learning goals of this course. There are three online communication ways: email, chat and discussion boards.

Email: All course material related emails should be sent within the Blackboard Vista email system. Students MUST login Blackboard to send and view emails. Emails sent within Blackboard are not able to be delivered to public email accounts. Emails are reserved for sensitive questions you feel may be disturbing if delivered to all students. All other course related questions should be posted to a specific learning module Discussion Board for course material documentation. Students can also send personal email to the instructor’s public email account for private reasons such as not being able to attend the chat because of sickness if students choose to.

Chat: Chat is voluntary and encouraged. The session is for real-time discussion of course materials. Each week the instructor will create a chat room dedicated to the specific week and answer questions in real time.

Tip for online chatting: Recall there are tens of people in the chat room; use concrete entities while chatting; avoid preps and obscurity.

Discussion board: Each learning module has its own discussion module. The participation is mandatory and contributes 10% toward to a student’s final grade. The discussion board is for asking and answering questions. In general, the instructor will answer the questions within 24 hours. Feel free to respond to each other’s questions. Please direct questions to a specific learning module Discussion Board for easy course material documentation and clarity. Therefore, the discussion board will be used as a Question & Answer repository.

ASSIGNMENT (EXAM) GUIDELINES

Components of Course Grade:

Discussion Board Participation

10

Assignment (9)

45

Final exam

25

Term Project

20

Grade Scale

90 ~ 100

A

85 ~ 89.9

A-

80 ~ 84.9

B+

75 ~ 79.9

B

70 ~ 74.9

B-

65 ~ 69.9

C+

60 ~ 64.9

C

< 60

F

Assignments

Exam Format

Make-up Exams

 TENTATIVE CLASS SCHEDULE

The schedule may be adjusted based on the actual progress in the semester. We thank Dr. Yong Guan for sharing many of his materials.

Order

Topics

Chapter

Readings

Overview

Work

0

Introduction

 

 

 

1

Chapter 1 Understanding the Digital Forensics Profession and Investigations Hide Details

Chapter 1

01/29/2017 - two weeks

2

Chapter 2 The Investigator’s Office and Laboratory

Chapter 2

 

02/05/2017  - one week

3

Chapter 3 Data Acquisition

Chapter 3

 

02/19/2017 - two weeks

 

4

Chapter 4 Processing Crime and Incident Scenes

Chapter 4

 

02/26/2017 - one week

5

Chapter 5 Working with Windows and CLI Systems

Chapter 5

03/12/2017 - two weeks

 

6

Chapter 6 Current Computer Forensics Tools

Chapter 6

 

03/19/2017 - one week

7

Chapter 7 Linux and Macintosh File Systems

Chapter 7

03/26/2017 - one week

 

8

Chapter 8 Recovering Graphics Files

Chapter 8

04/09/2017 - two weeks

 

9

Chapter 9 Computer Forensics Analysis and Validation

Chapter 9

04/23/2017 - two weeks

 

Final Exam